The Paradise papers & collaborative journalism

Whilst, not a breaking news story, I wanted to take a moment to break down the Paradise papers and the impact such a set of documents could have upon collaborative journalism.

To provide some context, the Paradise papers released on the 5th of November investigated a number of (13.4 million) documents regarding the offshore investments of a number of businesses and people. Offshore investments can sometimes be used to reduce taxes and particular countries have come to be known as ‘tax havens’.

The Paradise papers (and predecessor Panama papers) were only made possible through a combined effort and incorporated nearly 400 journalists from around the world.

This extensive number of journalists allowed the large number of documents to be analysed, and each journalist (or group of) to focus on different people/businesses.  It also allowed different collaborations and people to come together that otherwise would not have the opportunity to work together.

Trying to keep things secret and under wraps can be difficult through collaborative journalism as there is such a large number of people working on the project and leaks are a real risk.

The Paradise papers (and earlier Panama papers) successful demonstrated how collaborative journalism can be used to break larger stories that would not be possible otherwise and will hopefully promote further work in the future.

To learn more about the Paradise papers themselves and their development, check out this behind the scenes Vice documentary.

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